Camp McQuaide

Before Monterey Bay Academy

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The acquisition and transition of Camp McQuaide by the Central California Conference office to become Monterey Bay Academy is documented under the section on Leal Grunke.

In brief, the California National Guard established the 250th Coast Artillery Regiment in Capitola, California in 1926. Military documents from 1927 begin listing the training camp as Camp McQuaide. The camp is named in honor of a Catholic chaplain, Father Joseph P. McQuaide, for the National Guard. Camp McQuaide was the only military reservation so named. The California National Guard moved the regiment to San Andreas Road in Watsonville, California. Documents have claimed the reason for the relocation was because of the noise complaints from local chicken farmers, saying the artillery practice was disturbing the chickens. In 1940, the Coast Artillery Regiment is changed to the Coast Artillery Replacement Training Center (CARTC). Camp McQuaide was converted to the West Coast Processing Center in 1943, and placed in the surplus list in 1947.

Camp McQuaide
Camp McQuaide (barrack view)
Camp McQuaide
Camp McQuaide (entire property)
Camp McQuaide
Camp McQuaide (after barrack removal)


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California State Military Museum
Camp McQuaide

250th Coast Artillery (Personal Site)
Photos and document exceprts of the 250th Coast Artillery

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Sacramento District) - Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) Program
Camp McQuaide photos
Camp McQuaide historical reference material (PDF - 70+ MB)
Camp McQuaide historical documents (PDF)

Library of Congress
The Cadence (Camp McQuaide newspaper - reference information only)
Overs and Shorts (Camp McQuaide newspaper - reference information only)

Capitola Historical Museum
Photograph of the original 1926 Capitola 250th Coast Artillery location

TomFolio.com (Back Creek Books)
CARTC (Coast Artillery Replacement Training Center) Camp McQuaide (new recruit handbook) for sale

Coast and Antiaircraft Artillery (Reprint of World War II Order of Battle by Shelby L. Stanton)
Camp McQuaide was one of three CARTC facilities in the United States (along with Fort Eustis (later Camp Stewart) and Camp Callan (later at Fort Bliss)

Graniterock (local history)
Graniterock provided materials to build Camp McQuaide, Fort Ord, and the Navy airstrip in Watsonville.